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Transitioning from Dirt Bike to Snow Bike (and back again)

Posted by Kate's Real Food and Carrie Barton on 26th May 2021

Kate’s Real Food Brand Ambassador, Carrie Barton, continually impresses us as she paves the way for female athletes-- first in endurance dirt biking, and now she has completed her second season working to master the art of snow biking. She is proud to also be an ambassador for Timbersled, keeping her on the bike and in her element through the winter months.

Timbersled Transition

With no previous experience on motorized snow vehicles, we should have been more surprised at her success. But if you know Carrie, you know she doesn’t back down from a challenge. She was nervous to take on the first ride, but quickly fell in love with her Timbersled and how free she felt snow biking through some of her favorite terrain.

Carrie gives us her tips on what to expect when transitioning from a dirt bike to a snow bike:

1. Get safety training

To prepare for the season, Carrie made sure to gather knowledge from several industry professionals about understanding snow conditions and identifying potentially dangerous features and took an avalanche training course. Every season comes with its own risk, and education is key.

2. Know your terrain

Take your training further and prepare for a ride by checking snow conditions and understanding the area you’re riding in. Always be sure to check the maps and be ready for the expected conditions. Terrain makes a serious impact on your ride-- it's best to know what you’re getting into.

3. Invest in safety equipment

While biking as a sport comes with risk in all seasons, the snow elevates that risk. Make sure you are well equipped to handle any potential situation that may arise.

4. Count on your core

Carrie quickly learned that you move differently through the snow and relied much more on her core strength. With dirt biking, she is able to plant her feet as needed to help with a pivot turn or to push through a technical section to keep momentum. On the snowbike, there is no dabbing with a foot, so you have to do everything with balance and core strength and keep forward momentum in a much different way.

5. Embrace the freedom

Her favorite feeling, even when faced with a challenging ride or when she was first learning,, was the immediate freedom the snow bike had to offer. Not having to be restricted to a trail and picking her lines through the trees opened up a whole new world even on a familiar mountain.

6. The falls are more forgiving

While there is elevated risk with this sport, Carrie was pleased to be left with fewer bumps and bruises as well as less damage to the machine. Falling into soft powder is much preferred to rocks. This aspect allows for a very rapid progression with learning more technical skills.

7. Accessorize for snow

Getting your rig ready to convert to a snow bike comes with more than just a ski and a track. The cold conditions create a number of challenges with both bike performance and personal comfort but there are many accessories available to customize your snowbike and keep up with the changing season.

8. Clean up is a breeze

Last, but not least, one of Carrie’s favorite things about snow biking is a clean machine. The snow does the rinsing for her. Coming home, all she needs to do is change the oil, lubricate the chain, and put the beast away.

As the seasons change again, Carrie is so grateful to have a way to keep doing what she loves no matter what the weather brings. To learn more about Carrie and see what summer will bring for her, you can follow her here!

Transitioning from Dirt Bike to Snow Bike (and back again)

Posted by Kate's Real Food and Carrie Barton on 26th May 2021

Kate’s Real Food Brand Ambassador, Carrie Barton, continually impresses us as she paves the way for female athletes-- first in endurance dirt biking, and now she has completed her second season working to master the art of snow biking. She is proud to also be an ambassador for Timbersled, keeping her on the bike and in her element through the winter months.

Timbersled Transition

With no previous experience on motorized snow vehicles, we should have been more surprised at her success. But if you know Carrie, you know she doesn’t back down from a challenge. She was nervous to take on the first ride, but quickly fell in love with her Timbersled and how free she felt snow biking through some of her favorite terrain.

Carrie gives us her tips on what to expect when transitioning from a dirt bike to a snow bike:

1. Get safety training

To prepare for the season, Carrie made sure to gather knowledge from several industry professionals about understanding snow conditions and identifying potentially dangerous features and took an avalanche training course. Every season comes with its own risk, and education is key.

2. Know your terrain

Take your training further and prepare for a ride by checking snow conditions and understanding the area you’re riding in. Always be sure to check the maps and be ready for the expected conditions. Terrain makes a serious impact on your ride-- it's best to know what you’re getting into.

3. Invest in safety equipment

While biking as a sport comes with risk in all seasons, the snow elevates that risk. Make sure you are well equipped to handle any potential situation that may arise.

4. Count on your core

Carrie quickly learned that you move differently through the snow and relied much more on her core strength. With dirt biking, she is able to plant her feet as needed to help with a pivot turn or to push through a technical section to keep momentum. On the snowbike, there is no dabbing with a foot, so you have to do everything with balance and core strength and keep forward momentum in a much different way.

5. Embrace the freedom

Her favorite feeling, even when faced with a challenging ride or when she was first learning,, was the immediate freedom the snow bike had to offer. Not having to be restricted to a trail and picking her lines through the trees opened up a whole new world even on a familiar mountain.

6. The falls are more forgiving

While there is elevated risk with this sport, Carrie was pleased to be left with fewer bumps and bruises as well as less damage to the machine. Falling into soft powder is much preferred to rocks. This aspect allows for a very rapid progression with learning more technical skills.

7. Accessorize for snow

Getting your rig ready to convert to a snow bike comes with more than just a ski and a track. The cold conditions create a number of challenges with both bike performance and personal comfort but there are many accessories available to customize your snowbike and keep up with the changing season.

8. Clean up is a breeze

Last, but not least, one of Carrie’s favorite things about snow biking is a clean machine. The snow does the rinsing for her. Coming home, all she needs to do is change the oil, lubricate the chain, and put the beast away.

As the seasons change again, Carrie is so grateful to have a way to keep doing what she loves no matter what the weather brings. To learn more about Carrie and see what summer will bring for her, you can follow her here!